Political Roundup for September 7th, 2017

Hello from Philadelphia, where Jim Kenney’s courageous soda tax is at work saving lives in the name of public health and social justice.

President & Misc.

2020 Census: In news that could affect the accuracy of the next census, and therefore the upcoming congresssional apportionment, The Economist reports that the upcoming budget underfunds the Census Bureau by approximately $300 million.

Demographic Trends: In a development which will continue to shape our political landscape, non-Hispanic white Christians now make up less than 50% of the population. Maybe pushing policies that appeal almost exclusively to that specific demographic isn’t such a good idea for winning the future…

Redistricting: A slew of prominent Republicans, including John McCain, John Kasich, Bob Dole, John Danforth, Dick Lugar, Alan Simpson, and the Governator, have called on SCOTUS to end gerrymandering.

Sign of the Times: The Chamber of Commerce is spending millions in order to pressure Republicans into voting for The Donald’s yet-to-exist tax plan.

Governor

CT-Gov, CT-LG: Middletown Mayor Dan Drew (D) has picked State Rep. Liz Linehan (D-Cheshire) as his unofficial running mate ahead of their respective separate primaries.

IL-Gov, IL-LG: Moonbat fantasy and State Sen. Daniel Biss (D-People’s Republic of Evanston) has dropped his running mate, Carlos Ramirez-Rosa, over his “boycott, divestment, and sanctions” position on Israel.

Senate

AL-Sen: Birds of a feather… Freedom Caucus Chairman and NC US Rep. Mark Meadows (R-Cashiers) has endorsed repeatedly in-contempt ex-State Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore (R-Where Else but Alabama?) in the Republican primary to fill the seat vacated by AG Jeff Sessions.

House

IN-04: Former Indiana Workforce Development Commissioner and ex-State Rep. Steve Braun (R-Zionsville) will run to replace Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Indianapolis) in 2018. Braun, of the Indianapolis suburbs, is a business consultant.

PA-11: State Rep. Tarah Toohill (R-Butler Township), probably too busy having fun, won’t run for the soon-to-be-open seat being vacated by Rep. Lou Barletta (R-Hazleton).

PA-15: State Rep. Justin Simmons (R-Coopersburg) has decided to challenge one of the good ones, Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Allentown), in a primary. While Dent has historically significantly overperformed, the incumbent has butted heads with Trump acolytes.

SD-AL: Former Public Utilities Commission member Dusty Johnson claims to be on track to break the primary stage fundraising record of $400,000 set by Blake Curd (R-Sioux Falls) in 2010. It should be noted that Curd lost that primary to outgoing Rep. Kristi Noem (R-Castlewood).

WA-08: ICYMI, Rep. Dave Reichert (R-Auburn) will retire at the end of this term, his seventh, ahead of the 2018 buzzsaw midterms. We wish the former King County Sheriff and hero well as he potentially gears up for a rumored 2020 gubernatorial bid—or a payday on K Street. This is a district that has been represented by Republicans – Rod Chandler, Jennifer Dunn (mother of King County Commissioner and possible WA-08 candidate Reagan Dunn), and Dave Reichert – since its 1983 inception, yet there’s obviously nothing to see here regarding Reichert’s timing, folks. Paging electoral juggernaut and ex-State Sen. Steve Litzow (R-Mercer Island)…

State Level

TX Voter ID: The 5th Circuit has stayed a ruling against Texas’ voter ID law on the basis that the state is likely to succeed on the merits of its appeal, allowing the law to remain in place for this year’s elections.

TX HD-52: Four-term State Rep. Larry Gonzales (R-Round Rock) is retiring in a district that the Donald won by a single point (46.7%-45.3%). Mitt Romney won this same district by 12 (54.7%-42.4%).

TX SD-02: State Rep. Cindy Burkett (R-Mesquite) is challenging State Senator Bob Hall (R-Edgewood). Hall successfully primaried Burkett’s one-time boss, then State Sen. Bob Deuell (R-Greenville) in 2014 in this northeastern Dallas suburban and exurban district.

TX SD-08: Angela Paxton (R-McKinney), wife of TX AG Ken Paxton (R-McKinney), is mulling a run for the seat being vacated by Cruzian contrarian and State Sen. Van Taylor (R-Plano).

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124 Comments

  • RogueBeaver September 7, 2017 at 9:26 am

    CA-SEN: De Leon might challenge DiFi, other ambitious Dems circling. http://www.politico.com/story/2017/09/07/dianne-feinstein-california-primary-2018-242409


    QC/Blue Tory/M

    • Tekzilla September 7, 2017 at 10:03 am

      Not a big De Leon fan, would rather Feinstein retire than risk that. Would much prefer Newsom, Garcetti, Chiang or even someone like Schiff or Debra Bowen.


      36/M/NY-01 (D)

      • Left Coast Libertarian September 7, 2017 at 10:39 am

        What’s your objection to De Leon? He’s a grandstander but that’s not uncommon among politicians. He’s an SJW but Newsom is just as much of one. Our other senator is Kamala Harris. Every morning she asks herself what she can do to score points with progressives. If that means claiming 127 million people will lose insurance under the Republican plan, she says that.

        • jncca September 7, 2017 at 1:34 pm

          I’ve interacted a bit with de Leon and my assessment is that his heart is in the right place (he’s not in politics for the $, in other words), but he’s big on posturing and not the brightest. I guess a dumber version of Gavin Newsom might be a fair assessment.


          24, CA-6. Part Obama, Part May, Part Christian Democrat.

          • Left Coast Libertarian September 7, 2017 at 4:17 pm

            I don’t get your response. Accepting money is illegal (see Bob Menendez). If a politician is in politics for the $, he’d better hide it or he’s going to jail. I’ve met a few politicians and I never got the impression that any of the got in other than to do right by people. Some of them have gotten rich in their post-congressional careers but I’ve never gotten the impression from any of them that was their motivation for being in office.

            • jncca September 7, 2017 at 7:43 pm

              Well, the CA State Senate has had a couple members in recent years who were in it for the $. De Leon has flaws and I’m not a big fan of his but I don’t group him with someone like Calderon or even a Fabian Nunez type.


              24, CA-6. Part Obama, Part May, Part Christian Democrat.

  • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 9:29 am

    There is such a small set of R candidates in the WA-8 area that I suspect we will see on top tier GOP candidate emerge. The Jungle primary system and the nature of the seat encourages it. Top GOP candidates know you have to run flat out in August and in November. On the D side I can see the same situation. Money people and organizations might target one D candidate. Just a guess.

    Of course the August primary numbers might only be 140K or less but you still have to fully fund a campaign for two elections and run nearly all out for 6 months or so. Not for the faint of heart.

    • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 12:03 pm

      Besides NJ and VA there’s really no other game in town though; wouldn’t seem like GOP money would be hard to come by. It’s not like there will be all that heavy of an investment in NJ-Gov.

  • HS September 7, 2017 at 9:32 am

    That’s funny – I didn’t know only white non-Hispanics could be conservatives, moderate conservatives, or whatever the hell Trump is. You would think that non-whites would, for instance, prefer either being a hawk or a quasi hawk, either free trade or protectionism, either fiscal conservatism or big spending (see W. Bush and now Trump), etc.

    The Dems called and asked for their talking point back.

  • Republican Michigander September 7, 2017 at 9:37 am

    “””Maybe pushing policies that appeal almost exclusively to that specific demographic isn’t such a good idea for winning the future…””””

    And by treating them as a “dying demographic”, they start voting as a minority with heavy backlash against the Ds, academia, and Bush people. A lot of them did that and told the white leftists in the media to F off and “in your face” afterward.

    Identity politics is poison. “Demographics is destiny” talk is part of that.


    MI-08 - Michigan is a red state again. We need a 50 state strategy and an 83 county strategy.

    • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 10:15 am

      I never understand what people mean exactly when they say things like “identity politics is poison”. The natural tendency of people to align with their own in-group and what they perceive as that in-group’s interests is poison? It might very well be the case that democracy cannot last long in a polity stratified by race, gender, and whatever other attributes contribute to the culture wars, but given that blacks and Hispanics aren’t going to stop ethnic bloc politics anytime soon, why expect whites to do any different? You could argue that it is unnatural for blacks and Hispanics not to act as ethnic blocs, unnatural for whites not to do so, and the steady transformation of white Americans into an ethnic bloc advocating white interests in a multi-ethnic America is just an inevitable and natural development.

      If America’s future is going to be Brazil or Lebanon, and it definitely seems like that’s going to be America’s future, every group is going to try to grab the best deal they can get, and anyone who doesn’t isn’t going to last long.

      • MikeFL September 7, 2017 at 11:18 am

        The hyperbole of the white identity politics portion of the Trumpian wing never ceases to amaze me. The US becoming Lebanon?


        26 | FL-16/27 | FisCon

        • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 11:55 am

          Lebanon didn’t become Lebanon overnight. I question why you think it’s unlikely that America could devolve into an ethnic spoils system very similar to Lebanon – for one, there is already significant support on the left for apportioning all public and private positions of significance by demography; secondly, America shares the circumstance Lebanon did, which is geographical proximity to a foreign entity that sees that it can gain by exploiting the diversity of American society. You already have Mexican leaders like Vicente Fox bragging that Latinos will make whites a minority in America, and prominent Mexican politicians like Andres Obrador lobbying to use the large Mexican national population in America to alter American policy to favor Mexicans. When someone like Erdogan does this with the Turks in Europe, we call it thuggery; when the Mexicans do it in America, conservatives just bow their heads and let it happen.

          No other country or set of countries can exercise the kind of political influence in America that we are giving away to Mexico and the Latin American nations, because no other country has their geographical proximity. It is that combination of influence and proximity that convinced Samuel Huntington that sharp ethnic divides would emerge in 21st century America, and Huntington was prescient enough to predict the partition of Sudan and the Islamist turn of Turkey for similar reasons of ethno-cultural differences.

          • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 12:01 pm

            So I guess today won’t be a elections/politics day on RRH…lol

          • MikeFL September 7, 2017 at 1:33 pm

            Again, the impact of all of that is grossly exaggerated, but one reason why this is unlikely is the politics of white college grads and the white working class are diverging, as evidenced by the gap in those subgroups votes for Trump. I’m not a fan of the establishment-types look down on the WWC instead of trying to earn their votes back by implementing policies that would actually help them (and not cause them to follow Pied Piper Trump), but the alt-right’s increasing appetite for white nationalism and tribalism will not benefit anyone.


            26 | FL-16/27 | FisCon

            • krazen1211 September 7, 2017 at 6:20 pm

              As long as the Democrats control the media, academia, and entertainment, and fuel identity politics, that outcome might be inevitable. Ultimately it depends on when the left decides identity politics is no longer in its own interest.

              Jeff Flake whining in a book is not going to change anything.

      • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 12:39 pm

        This is America, not Brazil, Lebanon, or some other third world country. There is something exceptional about America that should make us better than this racial identity politics crap.
        If the Rs want to go from Reagan’s “shining city on a hill” to this white working class identity politics garbage, I’m out.


        Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

        • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:47 pm

          How white was America circa Reagan’s “shining city on a hill” era? 80%? 85%?

          • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 12:54 pm

            You’re completely ignoring assimilation. It has happened with every major and most minor groups that have come to the US, sans AAs (and even that has had some progress as of late). ‘White’ used to mean Anglo-Saxon Protestant. Now it encompasses a ton of Catholics, Jews, and Orthodox Christians. Similarly, more and more Hispanics are assimilating and checking ‘White’ on the census every year. Second-generation Asians tend to be very well assimilated. Yes, there are those who would attempt to divide the country along tribal lines for political gain, mostly on the left. All you’re doing by spouting this crap is helping them.


            24, R, TN-09
            Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

            • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 1:03 pm

              >‘White’ used to mean Anglo-Saxon Protestant. Now it encompasses a ton of Catholics, Jews, and Orthodox Christians

              This is not and never has been true. The Irish, the Italians and the Jews were always legally considered white in America. They faced discrimination and prejudice, and they were considered inferior to Anglo-Saxon Protestants, but they were never considered “non-white” the way the blacks and the Indians were.

              • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 7:13 pm

                Native-Americans outside of the reservation are actually a reasonably conservative voting bloc. Because they tend to be middle-class and Christian. Oddly, this group used to be an extremely Democratic voting bloc (almost voting like blacks), but they’ve swung dramatically Republican, which is part of why Democrats have absolutely collapsed in places like Eastern Oklahoma and Western North Carolina.

                The example of Native Americans might play itself out again. For one, almost all Native Americans have a lot of European ancestry (much like Latinos). And the pattern of Democrat vote sinks on the Rez + competitive swing voters outside the Rez might actually hold up with Latinos. With unassimilated, non-English speaking Latinos in gateway cities (NYC, LA) voting 90% Dem, and assimilated, English-speaking Latinos in the rest of the country being very competitive.


                I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

            • prsteve11 September 7, 2017 at 1:36 pm

              You have a good point. Once upon a time, the Irish and the Italian were regarded as separate races from whites. Today, obviously, they’re regarded just as whites.


              SC-03, Conservative Republican

              • jncca September 7, 2017 at 2:50 pm

                I see no world in which Marco Rubio is not considered just plan White by the time he is receiving Social Security.


                24, CA-6. Part Obama, Part May, Part Christian Democrat.

                • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 3:03 pm

                  That may be a bit too soon. I’d argue that it was around 1960 or 1965 that you could say that Italians and Eastern Europeans were sufficiently assimilated into American culture. (And even after that, you still had identity politics around Italians, Poles, etc in big cities for a couple more decades).
                  Assuming Rubio gets SS at age 67, it will be 2038, about two decades. I’d say that we are closer to 1920 than 1940 with regard to Hispanic assimilation, so two decades seems a bit soon.


                  Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

                  • jncca September 7, 2017 at 3:52 pm

                    I don’t think all Hispanics will be viewed equally. Cubans will likely be the first group to be assimilated into the “White” category, as they (at least in the US) tend to be of almost exclusively Caucasian descent, unlike the more mixed Mexicans or African-descended Puerto Ricans.


                    24, CA-6. Part Obama, Part May, Part Christian Democrat.

            • Republican Michigander September 7, 2017 at 2:42 pm

              “No Irish or Dogs need apply”


              MI-08 - Michigan is a red state again. We need a 50 state strategy and an 83 county strategy.

            • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 9:08 pm

              Assimilation is complicated. Pre-1960s American had a dominant self-confident culture that most immigrants (or their children) wanted to assimilate to. Now the dominant culture is self-hating and anti-white. Plenty of newcomers assimilate into that culture.
              It’s true that many Hispanics identify as white. Getting more to do so is probably the best way to win them over, but the GOP establishment has been doing just the opposite, pandering to them as a separate minority group. Another big difference is affirmative action, which rewards people who identify as an aggrieved minority group and don’t assimilate. Eliminating that ought to be a priority for the GOP, but most (including Trump) don’t want to touch it. Irish and Italians weren’t rewarded by the government for maintaining a separate identity.

        • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 12:48 pm

          Don’t take this the wrong way, because I generally agree with you, but looking at your signature, you’re already out. Your threat has no meaning because you (and a lot of others) have already taken your ball and gone home instead of fighting from within the party.


          24, R, TN-09
          Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

          • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 1:59 pm

            Fair enough. I’m still technically registered as a R in PA, since independents cannot vote in a party primary here, so I will continue to cast votes against Trumpist candidates.


            Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

  • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 10:25 am

    WI-Sen: Vukmir officially in. https://t.co/t4oRnmXvWI


    R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

  • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 10:26 am

    “Maybe pushing policies that appeal almost exclusively to that specific demographic isn’t such a good idea for winning the future…”

    Maybe we should try to implement policies that will help our base, and encourage it to expand. Maybe we shouldn’t treat its demise as inevitable, rather than as the result of government policies implemented by the left. Maybe we shouldn’t indulge fantasies that people who despise us will suddenly vote for us if we pander enough…

    • Izengabe September 7, 2017 at 10:54 am

      I think the point was the GOP should be pushing an agenda based on conservative ideas of less government and more individual rights rather than play the Democrats game of my people vs your people. The role of government should not be to rewards the followers of the people in power and punish the followers of those out of power. That is a road to ruin.


      Follow me on Twitter: @Izengabe_

      • HS September 7, 2017 at 11:23 am

        100%. And we should have politicians and groups who reach out to all communities to explain to them why conservatism works. Now, I am not saying we should totally disregard how they vote; with limited time and resources you go to places where you are most likely to win votes. But the idea that non-whites of all types are automatically a lost cause is fake news.

        • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 12:21 pm

          “But the idea that non-whites of all types are automatically a lost cause is fake news.”

          I don’t know that it’s fake news as much as it’s just 30,000 feet and not specific. I think when it comes to Hispanics GWB showed that there is a path to improved showing that kneecaps Dems. GWB probably owes both election wins to his Hispanic efforts. However in general more hispanics would seem to indicate higher likelihood of Dem victory. So it’s kind of like both sides are true.

          As for demographic inevitability, identity politics and such I think the electoral impact has for too long pointed at Texas, Arizona and Nevada. The idea that Texas is going to turn blue in my lifetime (I’m 40) is laughable. I think when people talk about demographic inevitability they might have the right thought but that it’s probably more at play in VA today and the next 2 states are NC and GA (never texas, NV is probably already playing out and AZ simply confuses me so I can’t say). And most of that in GA/NC is simply due to faster-growing AA populations being driven by in-migration…in other words Detroit and Cleveland moved to Charlotte and Atlanta. But even then I think it’s many more cycles before we could say NC is light blue like VA today and I’m not sure Georgia votes Dem for POTUS/Senate in my life time barring something very unusual. It’s a damn slow process in states so large.

          I also think demographic inevitability arguments always give too much focus on Hispanics at the expense of Asians. Asians are probably more D than Hispanics in VA (exit polls seem to show that for what they’re worth) and probably also are in other places (like WA and of course HI). If Asians voted closer to how whites do in VA I think VA would be reddish-purple rather than blueish-purple. Probably the same in some other states like WA or OR.

          • Wahoowa September 7, 2017 at 7:58 pm

            “It’s a damn slow process in states so large.”

            California went from reliable Republican to Democrat lock on the presidential level in basically 8 years. (1988-1996). Largely based on demographic change. So not so slow as you might think.


            CO-7

            • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 11:57 pm

              California floated between D+low and R+low in the 70s and 80s. It was never really a Republican bastion. It was just a swing state that happened to also have two winning Republican candidates hail from it (and therefore probably had a home-state effect for Nixon and Reagan as well).


              24, R, TN-09
              Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

              • californianintexas September 8, 2017 at 1:05 am

                In fact, California’s PVI hovered between R+5 and D+5 from 1932 all the way to 2000, with a slow but steady D trend since 1980. To find a more reliably Republican California, you’d have to go way back to the 1920s.

                And even when California was voting for Republican presidential candidates more often than not, thanks in part to two of them being from there, Democrats held majorities most of the time at the U.S. House and state legislative levels since 1958.


                34, Female, Libertarian, UT-02 (hometown CA-31), theelectionsgeek.com

      • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 12:42 pm

        You can’t implement your agenda without winning elections, and you can’t win elections in the long run if you ignore your base. I don’t want our politics to be tribal, and I certainly never suggested punishing the other side. But politics will get more tribal the more minority immigration there is. Can you cite a single multiethic country in the world where politics isn’t predominantly tribal? You can only have ideological politics when there is a single dominant ethnic group. Otherwise politics inevitably becomes tribal. You should support cutting off immigration if you want to stop tribalism from increasing.
        We both want less government, but less government isn’t popular with the public. The only chance of implementing it is to pair it with something that is popular, like populism/patriotism/anti-leftism.

        • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:49 pm

          Singapore is a multi-ethnic country where politics mostly isn’t tribal, but Singapore is also a one-party police state.

          • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 12:52 pm

            China also fits into that basket.


            R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

            • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:53 pm

              China is 90% Han. Their internal divisions are mostly regional, like Beijing vs Hong Kong or Beijing vs Shanghai or rural vs urban.

              • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 6:51 pm

                Han is not really a useful ethnic category when they speak like 10 different mutually unintelligible languages. Technically, the term used to describe the Han translates into “nationality” – the term that actually means “ethnicity” in Chinese is used to describe those regional groups. To better understand the term Han, imagine if the Roman Empire never fell and the word Roman today described Italians, Greeks, Iberians, Germans, and Gauls who all spoke some degree of Latin.

                Of course, what actually bolsters your argument is that China is not a democracy. In Taiwan, which does have a pretty strong diversity of Han ethnicities, politics is extremely tribal and ethnically polarized. Taiwan has remarkably polarized/tribal politics especially when you consider that the parties aren’t very different on policy.


                I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

          • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 9:17 pm

            “In multiracial societies, you don’t vote in accordance with your economic interests and social interests, you vote in accordance with race and religion.”
            -Lee Kuan Yew, founder of Singapore
            http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/spiegel-interview-with-singapore-s-lee-kuan-yew-it-s-stupid-to-be-afraid-a-369128.html

        • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 12:50 pm

          You could make a case for Brazil as a multi-ethnic nation with non-tribal politics.


          R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

          • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:52 pm

            You really couldn’t. Brazilian society is extremely stratified by race and the politics are no less so. Their university fiascos are even worse than ours; in several Brazilian federal universities, black NGOs get to form committees that vet how “black” the black students are to determine who is favored for affirmative action and who’s out of luck.

            • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 12:57 pm

              You’re making a societal argument, not a political one. The two are not equivalent.


              R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

              • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:58 pm

                I’m making both. Politics is downstream from culture.

                • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 1:01 pm

                  We’re talking at cross purposes here. My comment was about the political system in isolation.


                  R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

        • Izengabe September 7, 2017 at 1:08 pm

          That’s nonsense! Politics can be just as tribal with one ethnic group as it can be with multiple ethnic groups if the political culture allows it.Just look at North Ireland where a group of ethically and linguistically indistinguishable people spent hundreds of years fighting with each other because one group didnt eat communion crackers. Viewing people as cogs in a tribal block is the antithesis of what individualism (and America) is all about. America is a melting pot in which all different nationalities and ethnicities can come together and become Americans. This idea that America has a dominant ethnic group is nonsense because even within “whites”, “Latinos”, “Asians” and “blacks” there are hundreds of different variations that can tear people apart. Treating every American as an individual is how you make them Americans and win elections. It is much easier to win elections by appealing to everyone as oppose to pitting us against them.


          Follow me on Twitter: @Izengabe_

          • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 9:53 pm

            The Northern Ireland conflict was between two different ethnic groups, the Irish Catholics and Scots-Irish protestants. They were fighting because they didn’t see themselves as part of the same body politic and neither wanted to be ruled by the other (not communion wafers).
            I don’t view “people as cogs in a tribal block”, but I also recognize that most people in the world have some ethnic/racial identity. If you refuse to acknowledge this, you are not really treating them as individuals, since you are trying to fit them into your ideological mold. The fact that there are variations within ethnic groups doesn’t mean that they don’t exist, any more than the fact that there are variations within America means that America has no distinct identity.
            As for what America is about, read the preamble to the constitution: “…secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity”. Principles and ethnicity are both there. Assimilation happens, but it is neither easy nor automatic, and it is foolish to think it won’t break down under the combined stress of mass immigration and multiculturalism.
            I’d like to know when your strategy for winning elections has worked. You didn’t answer my question about which multiethic (democratic) country in the world where politics isn’t predominantly tribal.

    • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 12:15 pm

      Well according to the survey by the Public Religion Research Institute mentioned in the Daily Roundup, now only 29% of Dems are non-Hispanic White Christians (compared to around 50% just a decade ago) as opposed to almost 75% of Republicans. So clearly the parties have different bases in terms of race/ethnicity as well as religious affiliation. About 27% of the US population is not religiously affiliated according to the survey, and these people are most concentrated in the NorthEast and the West Coast in particular, which are areas where the Dems are strongest. To give you an idea of the scope of change, according to the survey, in 1976, non-Hispanic white Christians made up about 81% of the population, as opposed to about 43% now. This reflects both the reduction in the non-Hispanic white population and the rise of those who do not have religious affiliation. Also the non Hispanic Christian white population is aging; 62% of non Hispanic white evangelicals and Catholics are over 50 and 59% of mainstream Protestants are. This is why SJW type Dems are in effect writing off white Christian working class voters, many of whom supported Trump. To them the path to power is with the minority group population and those who are not religiously affiliated, groups that are growing in strength and numbers.

      • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 2:15 pm

        “This is why SJW type Dems are in effect writing off white Christian working class voters, many of whom supported Trump. To them the path to power is with the minority group population and those who are not religiously affiliated, groups that are growing in strength and numbers.”

        The SJW type Ds in the past election wrote off *secular* WWC voters, and many of these voters switched from Obama to Trump. These voters have largely voted D in federal elections for the last 20 years, which is a big part why the Northeast and the Midwest largely stuck with the Ds until 2016. (The WWC who are religious Christians have been voting heavily R since the Reagan years.) There are only so many people you can write off before it becomes impossible to win elections. And even among groups you do badly among, outreach is necessary in order to reduce margins.


        Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

    • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 6:47 pm

      Is the GOP base that we should be expanding what you think it is? Middle-class Hispanics who speak English are almost certainly more Republican than whites with a humanities PHD of dubious economic value.


      I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

      • Conservative First September 7, 2017 at 8:45 pm

        I can’t imagine what I wrote that would make you think I consider humanities PhDs part of the GOP base. For what it’s worth, I would like to target student aid to majors that lead to jobs in their fields, which would put most leftist professors out of work.

  • Izengabe September 7, 2017 at 10:46 am

    @RRR re: PA-15 I take issue with referring to Charlie Dent as “one of the good ones”. Charlie Dent is one of the prime reasons why online poker is illegal and for that alone the man deserves a primary. Dent loves pork and corporate welfare. He’s one of the biggest backers of the Ex-Im Bank in the House and finally killing the New Deal era corporate pork entity would be a heck of a lot easier without Dent. Bottom line is Dent is the kind of big government RINO who has been subject to primary challenges since 2010 and his opposition to the GOP agenda predates Donald Trump. Simmons on the other hand is not a Trumpkin. He’s really a Toomey type. In this battle Simmons is one of the good ones.


    Follow me on Twitter: @Izengabe_

    • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 11:06 am

      I 100% agree that Ex-IM bank is corporate welfare but I also note that numerous other countries have similar programs to subsidize the exports of their corporations.
      I am all for free trade but why disarm our exporters without getting other countries to do so?

    • TennesseeMike September 7, 2017 at 2:58 pm

      I agree, Dent is not one of the good guys. When I lived in PA I was always hoping Dent would lose in the GOP primary. His is basically a RINO and has been by far the most liberal member of PA’s Republican US House delegation for most of the time he has been in the US House. We can do much better.


      TN-2 District. A Social and Fiscal Conservative Republican

  • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 11:19 am

    The Trump Admin got its 2nd District Court Judge, when Timothy Kelly was confirmed Tuesday by a vote of 94-2 to be a DC District Judge. Gillibrand and Warren voted no. But there are still over 100 federal judicial vacancies to fill and I believe around 50 nominations have been made so far. I think Judiciary Chair Grassley has pledged to try to move these nominations along at a quicker pace than has been happening so far.

    • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 11:42 am

      It’s utterly confusing to me what exactly the Judiciary Committee is even doing. It’s not like they’re doing hurricane relief debates or trying to solve the looming debt crisis. They do judicial stuff…I hope.

      When you look at the 5th district, which between the Circuit itself and the districts courts in that circuit has like 20 vacancies. I mean I get many don’t have nominees (which itself is a problem) but I can’t believe there’s no one who can get Trump’s ear and literally just own this Circuit for the next 50 years. It’s not like they’d struggle to get blue slips in LA/MS/TX…

      If your goal in politics is to win only and then not do anything then what’s the point?

      • Midnight901 September 7, 2017 at 12:06 pm

        Coincidentally, Trump nominated 5 people to the Texas district courts just today. I believe there’s some kind of logjam with the 5th circuit positions — there are two Texas vacancies for the circuit, but a lot of qualified contenders, and some squabbling among Cruz, Cornyn and Abbott as to who should get the nominations.

        • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 12:09 pm

          I mean that makes sense, and the circuit itself is plenty well GOP-appointee full…trump would jus tbe enshrining that for decades. But there are 18 district court vacancies…I think at least 3 of the districts have 4 vacancies…get your arse in gear?

          • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 12:22 pm

            There were Judiciary Committee hearings for two circuit court nominees (Chicago and Cincinnati) yesterday so it looks like things are starting to move along a little more now with the judicial nominations. I don’t know if Dems are still engaging in stalling tactics like the 30 hour delay.

      • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 2:51 pm

        Here is the lowdown on the slew of judicial nominations that out today

        https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/09/07/president-donald-j-trump-announces-seventh-wave-judicial-candidates

        I do believe the pace of confirmations of district judges will pick. One reason for the slowdown has been the ABA. Trump/Sessions are no longer relying on ABA to prescreen nominees but the democrats are insisting on getting ABA ratings before they will proceed. So to avoid the 30 hour rule plus committee delays Grassley is waiting for ABA ratings and they take a month or two. I do note that the Trump nominees are getting great to super ratings from the ABA.

        • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 3:02 pm

          Ryan Bounds was pre-screened with Oregon’s senators. I am not sure if they will approve of him but he does have an outstanding resume. He wanted as a low level appointee at the Bush 43 White house. He worked as an asssitant AG in DC office and then went to AG office in Oregon in 2010. He clerked for a Federal Appeals judge after undergrad at Stanford and Yale Law school. He is an active partisan as he has been in the federal prosecutor office for +10 years but has conservative ties. Seems to be a top tier conservative with no baggage.

        • prsteve11 September 7, 2017 at 3:11 pm

          I think the pace of all the judicial confirmations will pick up. With the spending drama averted until December, the Senate will have more time on its hands and will likely move ahead with confirmations. District appointments are nice but I’m most interested in the Circuit court confirmations.


          SC-03, Conservative Republican

          • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 3:59 pm

            I do think the pace of district court spots will pickup. No doubt about that. I think we can look forward to 2 or 3 Circuit confirmations per month. I think Erickson will be up next followed by Larsen then Barrett.

            I should note that all three circuit court nominees today have Federalist society ties along with outstanding resumes.

            • prsteve11 September 7, 2017 at 4:22 pm

              I should note that all three circuit court nominees today have Federalist society ties along with outstanding resumes.

              That’s great. The Senate should keep the pace up on the confirmations as it’s one of the most important, enduring things a president can do.


              SC-03, Conservative Republican

              • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 4:44 pm

                Also, so far they’re actually getting it done. We need to keep the ball rolling on that. If it stops, we might not be able to get it started again.


                24, R, TN-09
                Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

                • prsteve11 September 7, 2017 at 4:46 pm

                  I agree. I think that most if not all Republican senators, whatever their shortcomings, know how critically important this is. And it’s also a major accomplishment that’s fairly easy to make the case that conservatives are getting something from a Republican White House and Senate.


                  SC-03, Conservative Republican

                  • rdelbov September 7, 2017 at 4:57 pm

                    GOP has confirmed three Circuit spots-there are 21 vacancies with 6 more to occur within the year. That is 30 and in Obama 1st 4 years he confirmed 28 circuit spots. So with three done and 8 more this year (my guess) while we see 2 a month for 10 months in 2018—we get to about 30. So Grassley and the GOP exceed Obama’s 1st term numbers by December 2018.

                    Without any additional seats we could get to 20 more by fall of 2020.

      • krazen1211 September 7, 2017 at 6:22 pm

        They are prioritizing circuit level nominees….which should run dry in about 5 months. Then I suspect they will move to district nominees.

  • shamlet September 7, 2017 at 1:03 pm

    Ivey is officially running for a full term. http://www.decaturdaily.com/news/other_news/state_capital/ivey-says-she-ll-run-for-governor-in/article_84964900-be58-50b5-9152-98008b6c3ecd.html#utm_campaign=blox&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social


    R, MD-7. Put not your trust in princes. Process is more important than outcome.

    • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 1:28 pm

      In 2010 Bob Bentley beat Roy Moore in the AL-Gov GOP primary. Also in 2010 Ivey beat Jim Folsom Jr for LG 51-48. In 2006 Folsom beat Luther Strange for LG 51-49. In 2018 we get Moore vs Strange fo Sneate and Ivey. It’s a small world after all…though no surprise in a relatively small state with less upward mobility.

      Also, Alabama’s current state treasurer is named Young Boozer? That is awesome.

      Anyways, can Battle beat Ivey in the primary? His resume seems quite strong…

  • Greyhound September 7, 2017 at 1:10 pm

    “Maybe pushing policies that appeal almost exclusively to that specific demographic isn’t such a good idea for winning the future”
    So you agree then that dumping the Bush-era Conservatism that only ever appealed to that specific demographic in favor of expanding our base is a good idea then! Because Trump did about 4 points better with both non-whites and non-Christians than Romney did.


    R, 26, CA-18. Anti-Anti-Trump

    • MikeFL September 7, 2017 at 1:25 pm

      Bush-era “conservatism” and Trump-era “conservatism” are both toxic in different ways.


      26 | FL-16/27 | FisCon

    • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 1:31 pm

      Is comparing to Romney that useful of a check though? Romney was so uncomfortable throughout his race people just never got to liking him; I doubt your average Obama(2012)-Trump voter could tell you what Romney even campaigned on.

      • MikeFL September 7, 2017 at 1:35 pm

        Hillary was significant worse a candidate than Obama too, and even then she still won the popular vote.


        26 | FL-16/27 | FisCon

      • Greyhound September 7, 2017 at 2:05 pm

        I know. I’m just always perplexed when people act like the GOP’s demographic problems started with and are the sole fault of Trump. Like we were sitting pretty circa 2013 or so, and if not for Trump the GOP would be crushing with Hispanics and Atheists by now.


        R, 26, CA-18. Anti-Anti-Trump

        • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 3:26 pm

          Ah well then you were/are spot on.

        • Vosmyorka September 7, 2017 at 5:21 pm

          That IS annoying, but what’s more annoying is the extremely prevalent idea that Trump helped, rather than performing measurably worse than Romney.


          Right-leaning anti-Trump Indy. OH-3. Male, Russoanglohispanophone.

    • district1 September 7, 2017 at 5:55 pm

      Given the well-documented problems with the exit poll, I wouldn’t put any stock in that supposed 4-point shift.


      ex D flack (ex flack, not ex D)

      • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 6:57 pm

        It’s not just the exit polls. The CCES more or less confirmed this.

        http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/another-look-back-at-2016/


        I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

        • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 7:02 pm

          In fact, the CCES has Trump improving among almost every conceivable minority group. Even LGBT Americans with a college degree (with an even huger boost among LGBT voters without one)!

          http://www.pleeps.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2016vs2012.gif


          I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

          • Greyhound September 7, 2017 at 7:11 pm

            In fact the only demographic here that Romney does better than Trump in is . . .White Evangelical Christians with a College Degree.


            R, 26, CA-18. Anti-Anti-Trump

            • district1 September 7, 2017 at 8:05 pm

              If that doesn’t raise questions about this data then I don’t know what will.


              ex D flack (ex flack, not ex D)

              • Greyhound September 7, 2017 at 8:30 pm

                Considering where Trump under-performed Romney the most (Upscale Sunbelt Suburbs), that actually sounds about right to me.


                R, 26, CA-18. Anti-Anti-Trump

              • krazen1211 September 7, 2017 at 9:10 pm

                I do not see how folks can claim Trump tanked with both college whites and also non-whites in the aggregate (as opposed to cherry picking small areas). He did 2 points better than Romney.

                Those voters exist somewhere. So Trump must have done well enough with one or the other.

                • TexasR September 7, 2017 at 9:17 pm

                  The Donald did one point worse than Mitt.


                  Whatever we're talking about, it's all Frank Meyer's fault
                  Be careful what you wish for

                  • krazen1211 September 7, 2017 at 9:19 pm

                    Obviously I was referring to the 2 party vote, or the margins. Whichever you pick. Which is the only usable metric, really, unless one has a desire to take out a divining rod regarding the 3rd party vote.

                    • TexasR September 7, 2017 at 9:26 pm

                      Really? That’s the only usable metric? I mean, if you want to ignore the historically bad numbers that the Donald posted in the sunbelt metros, then I guess that’s not my problem.


                      Whatever we're talking about, it's all Frank Meyer's fault
                      Be careful what you wish for

                • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 10:40 pm

                  Here’s my take. Trump tanked among college whites. He also did slightly worse among college non-whites. Trump did substantially better (almost 20% better) among non-college whites, and did somewhat better among non-college non-whites (especially among males). In total, Trump did slightly better among non-whites because non-college voters are considerably larger than college.

                  The D’s problem in 2016 wasn’t just a WWC problem. It was a working class problem.


                  Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

  • cer September 7, 2017 at 1:46 pm

    I’m a long coastal NC, and it looks like we will be ok here. However, my heart goes out to the folks in SE Florida! GOD HELP THEM ALL! 🙁


    Conservative first, Republican second!

  • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    President-2020: Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH) “doesn’t know” if he’s going to run for President in 2020.

    http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/09/see_rep_tim_ryan_non-answer_wh.html#incart_river_home


    30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

    • district1 September 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm

      His recent endorsement of corporate tax cuts should go over well in a Democratic primary.


      ex D flack (ex flack, not ex D)

    • TexasR September 7, 2017 at 2:12 pm

      Interestingly enough, I happen to know that Tim Ryan will be running for a tenth term in 2020.


      Whatever we're talking about, it's all Frank Meyer's fault
      Be careful what you wish for

      • Indy1975a September 7, 2017 at 2:17 pm

        Oh, I don’t know about that… Tim Ryan may be retiring (or may be forcibly retired).


        Independent, R until November 2016. Proud "Globalist Cuck"!

        • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 2:18 pm

          Well, not in 2020. His district will still be around.


          30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

          • californianintexas September 7, 2017 at 2:41 pm

            2022?


            34, Female, Libertarian, UT-02 (hometown CA-31), theelectionsgeek.com

            • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 2:43 pm

              Right but I tend to think Kaptur will be have her district eliminated — not Ryan.


              30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

              • TexasR September 7, 2017 at 2:49 pm

                The new “commission” is likely going to want to eliminate the 16th, as it lacks a geographic base.


                Whatever we're talking about, it's all Frank Meyer's fault
                Be careful what you wish for

                • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 3:03 pm

                  Do you mean the commission that’s going to be on the 2018 statewide ballot?


                  30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

                  • TexasR September 7, 2017 at 3:13 pm

                    Yes. Given that the other commission referendum got over 70% and that this time, the Ohio Democrats aren’t basically saying “we’re trying to overturn the last election” by making it retroactive; which is probably why their 2012 attempt failed, I’m going to assume that this new commission measure will pass.


                    Whatever we're talking about, it's all Frank Meyer's fault
                    Be careful what you wish for

              • Vosmyorka September 7, 2017 at 5:25 pm

                Whether a renewed Republican gerrymander goes after Kaptur or Ryan is probably going to depend most on where different members live (going after Ryan is easier with the current configuration of incumbents), I think in a neutral map a Youngstown-based Democratic district that should be pretty safe for Ryan would definitely be preserved, while it’s quite easy to see Kaptur getting thrown into a “fair fight”, or even Leans R, seat with Latta in such a map.


                Right-leaning anti-Trump Indy. OH-3. Male, Russoanglohispanophone.

            • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 2:48 pm

              Eh, it really matters what happens elsewhere. I’m in favor of the strategy of cutting OH-09 and making his district a bit more competitive. Cutting it is really difficult if you want to protect incumbents.


              24, R, TN-09
              Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

              • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 4:21 pm

                Wouldn’t getting rid of OH-6 make it easier to target Ryan’s seat? In 2022 each OH district is going to need around 785k people, currently it looks like only OH3, OH12 and OH15 will be able to stay whole (if desired). Almost every other seat needs at least 50k people but it looks like OH6 could need close to 100k people. Chop up OH6 and put the reddest chunk in Ryan’s seat and then just re-spread the rest of the state with Fudge/Kaptur/Beatty as vote sinks.

                It’d seem any population bordering WV would be terrible for Tim Ryan. Oh6 in it’s current form might as well be a WV-4.

                • Son_of_the_South September 7, 2017 at 4:50 pm

                  Nope. OH-06 is actually one of the few things that makes it possible in the first place. It’s moved so far to the right that you can pretty much throw Youngstown in there without much chance of Johnson losing. Also, remember that giving every R a seat to run in is going to be a priority that ranks higher than which D seat gets cut (assuming we even get an R map). Johnson lives in Marietta. You really can’t just cut up his seat without double-bunking him. I guess that you could call it a compromise map by throwing him in with Tim Ryan. That would be possible, but the seat would have to have voted for Trump by a decent margin, or it really wouldn’t be a fair fight, given that a lot of district’s Trump voters also voted for Obama.


                  24, R, TN-09
                  Classical liberals are a minority. Fusionism is the answer.

  • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 2:04 pm

    CO-Gov: Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne (D) officially announces her candidacy.

    http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/lt-gov-donna-lynne-officially-announces-run-for-governor


    30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

    • Izengabe September 7, 2017 at 4:25 pm

      This can’t be the same Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne who swore she had no ambitions to run for Governor when she was appointed Lt Gov?


      Follow me on Twitter: @Izengabe_

      • TennesseeMike September 8, 2017 at 12:56 am

        It’s her evil clone. 🙂


        TN-2 District. A Social and Fiscal Conservative Republican

  • Mayor Perk September 7, 2017 at 2:05 pm

    AL-Gov: St. Sen. Bill Hightower (R) is in.

    http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/09/sen_bill_hightower_formally_an.html


    30. OH-12. Establishment Republican.

  • cinyc September 7, 2017 at 4:06 pm

    I have a new diary up, which details the 2016 and 2008 presidential vote in each NYC City Council District. It is here:

    http://rrhelections.com/index.php/2017/09/07/presidential-results-by-current-new-york-city-council-district/

    • Izengabe September 7, 2017 at 4:27 pm

      Thanks!!!! This is awesome.


      Follow me on Twitter: @Izengabe_

    • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 7:42 pm

      Great maps and table! Right now looks like the GOP will hold the 3 NYC council seats they have and have a chance at picking up the open 43rd Council District in Brooklyn, which has a lot of Italian-American and Irish-American voters. The 43rd was Trump’s 7th best district out of the 51 in the NYC Council according to your table; he got 41% of the vote in the district. About half of the 94186 voters in the district are Dems, with the rest being Repubs, Independents, or Third party members. Although the district is now held by Dem Councilman Gentile, who is running for Brooklyn DA in the Dem primary, before that it was held by Marty Golden, a Repub who is now a state senator. So it is competitive, particularly in a likely low turnout election. There are 3 Repubs and 5 Dems running for the office in the primaries. The attached article gives you the details about the candidates.

      http://citylimits.org/2017/09/07/brooklyn-council-district-stands-alone-as-site-of-two-party-primaries/

    • kewgardens September 7, 2017 at 9:04 pm

      LOL. Trump lost to Stein in the 36th CCD! That’s a district of more than 150,000 people.

      Was there a larger federal, state or local district in the country where this happened? I’m guessing that Trump beat Stein in the Berkeley and Cambridge area.

      • californianintexas September 8, 2017 at 12:30 am

        Stein did finish ahead of Trump in Berkeley. Nader beat Bush there in 2000 as well.


        34, Female, Libertarian, UT-02 (hometown CA-31), theelectionsgeek.com

  • legofan2001 September 7, 2017 at 4:08 pm

    Can’t believe that there is no mention of this https://www.facebook.com/DinoRossiWA/?fref=ts

    • rdw72777 September 7, 2017 at 4:22 pm

      I’m shocked Dino Rossi has a Facebook page.

  • Tekzilla September 7, 2017 at 6:52 pm

    Dent retiring. Could see a bunch of these now.

    http://www.cityandstatepa.com/content/sources-congressman-dent-will-not-stand-reelection


    36/M/NY-01 (D)

  • StatenIslandTest September 7, 2017 at 7:14 pm

    So when will the NJGOP counter with the ultimate gerrymandering lawsuit when our 3-cycle average legislative representation rip-off is about 11 percentage points?


    31, Jersey City

  • VastBlightKingConspiracy September 7, 2017 at 7:51 pm

    Conspiracy theorist Louise Mensch and Evan McMullin supporter amusingly fired her (pro bono) lawyer over twitter for getting into a twitter argument with Evan McMullin. http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/07/louise-mensch-fires-her-lawyer-on-twitter/

    Good to see the traditional right being as effective as always!


    I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Republican.

  • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 8:23 pm

    A number of Dems are not looking forward to Hillary Clinton’s upcoming book tour, as they fear it will pick on some of the “scabs” from the 2016 campaign. In particular, in the book she takes pot shots at Sanders, Obama and even Biden. Dem operatives want the focus to be on Trump and his problems and think she is a distraction from that focus. A recent NBC News poll showed her favorable ratings are only 30%, the lowest ever recorded for her. One Twitter joke about her book tour is that she will be making a stop in Wisconsin – too late now Hillary!

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/09/07/hillary-clinton-book-tour-democrats-242419

  • cinyc September 7, 2017 at 8:40 pm

    Republican NYC mayoral candidate Nicole Malliotakis on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s failure to say whether the Christopher Columbus statue in Columbus Circle should stay or go: “I think he’s a bad Italian, he should change his name back to Wilhelm.”

    https://twitter.com/AlexSilverman/status/905860590601736192

    • Manhatlibertarian September 7, 2017 at 9:08 pm

      Well deBlasio relies mainly on minority group voters (particularly African American ones) and SJW white liberals (like where I live in Manhattan) but Italian American voters in NYC usually go for Repub candidates. If he felt he really needed Italian American voters he wouldn’t be playing games about whether or not the statue should be removed, since Columbus is a hero to many Italian Americans (even if he was an agent of Spain). Of course Cuomo (deB’s nemisis) wants the statue to stay, although he doesn’t have jurisdiction over it. But deB does say he will still march in the Columbus Day parade and is not in favor of renaming Columbus Day “Indigenous People’s Day” like they did in Los Angeles.

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