Iowa Resources

Population: 3,123,899 (2015)

Filing deadline: March 9, 2018.

Primary: June 5, 2018.

Iowa (D+1) is a swing state, where both parties can and do compete in all statewide elections. Iowa closely defends its status as the first in the nation for Presidential nominations. It is 91% White.

FEDERAL LEVEL

Electors: 6. Iowa has gone Democratic in all Presidential elections since 1988, except for 2004. It turned sharply GOP in 2016, but is still considered something of a swing state.

Sena­tors: 2 Republicans.

Joni Ernst

Senator class 2: Joni Ernst (R)
Committees: Agriculture, Armed Services, Environment, Small Business.

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Joni Ernst

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, May 16, 2016:
Veteran and State Senator Joni Ernst (b.1970) won the open seat for the GOP in 2014, with 52%.

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Chuck Grassley

Senator class 3: Chuck Grassley (R)
Committees: Judiciary (Chair), Agriculture, Finance, Budget.

Democratic nomineePatty Judge
Republican nominee: Chuck Grassley

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
State Representative and Congressman Chuck Grassley (b.1933) was first elected to the Senate in 1980. He won 60 % in 2016.

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Representatives: 4 Representatives; 1 Democrat and 3 Republicans. An independent commission redraws the districts in Iowa. If no candidate wins more than 35% in a primary election, the nomination is made by the district convention.

Rod Blum

District 1
Representative: Rod Blum (R)
Committees: Small Business, Oversight.

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Rod Blum

Rating, July 22, 2017:
Leans GOP.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
The district (D+5) covers the northeastern corner of the state and is 93% White. Businessman Rod Blum (b.1955) won the open seat in 2014 and has been a staunch conservative instead of carefully voting his swing district. He still won reelection with 54% in 2016.

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Dave Loebsack

District 2
Representative: Dave Loebsack (D)
Committees: Energy & Commerce.

Democratic nominee: Dave Loeb­sack
Republican nominee: ?

Rating, July 22, 2017:
Leans Dem.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
The district (D+4) covers the southeastern corner of Iowa and is 90% White. Professor Dave Loebsack (b.1952) beat an incumbent Republican in 2006 and won 54% in 2016.

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David Young

District 3
Representative: David Young (R)
Committees: Appropriations.

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: David Young

Rating, July 22, 2017:
Likely GOP.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
The district (R+0) covers the southwestern corner of the state, including Des Moines and is 89% White. David Young (b.1968) was a staffer to several GOP politicians before winning this open seat in 2014. He won 54% in 2016.

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Steve King

District 4
Representative: Steve King (R)
Committees: Agriculture, Judiciary, Small Business.

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Steve King

Rating, September 3, 2016:
Safe GOP.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
The district (R+5) covers the northwestern corner of the state and is 92% White. Contractor and State Senator Steve King (b.1949) has held it since 2002. He won 61% in 2016.

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STATE LEVEL

Inauguration Day: Tuesday after the second Monday of January.

There are no term limits for any of the State Offices in Iowa.

Kim Reynolds

Governor: Kim Rey­nolds (R)

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Kim Rey­nolds

Rating, Sep 16, 2017:
Lean GOP.

Status, May 23, 2017:
Lawyer Terry Bran­stad (b.1946) was Governor for four consecutive terms from 1983 until 1999. He made a comeback in 2010 by defeating the incumbent Democrat and won 59% in 2014. The longest serving Governor in the history of the USA, he was made Ambassador to China in May 2017. LG and State Senator Kim Reynolds (b.1959) then became Iowa’s first female Governor.

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Adam Gregg

Lieutenant Governor: Adam Gregg (R)

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Adam Gregg

Rating, Sep 16, 2017:
Lean GOP.

Status, May 28, 2017:
The LG is chosen by the party’s gubernatorial nominee (but must be approved by the state convention) and is elected on the same ticket. LG Kim Rey­nolds became Governor in May 2017 and appointed State Public Defender Adam Gregg as new acting LG. As such, he will perform ceremonial and administrative duties associated with the office, but will not be a part of the line of succession.

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Paul Pate

Secretary of State: Paul Pate (R)

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Paul Pate

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, May 16, 2016:
Businessman and State Senator Paul Pate (b.1958) held this office for one term from 1995 until 1999. He made a comeback in 2014 with 49%.

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Michael Fitzgerald

Treasurer: Michael Fitz­gerald (D)

Democratic nominee: Michael Fitz­gerald
Republican nominee: ?

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, May 16, 2016:
Businessman Michael Fitz­gerald (b.1951) was first elected all the way back in 1982 and won 53% in 2014.

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Mary Mosiman

Auditor: Mary Mosiman (R)

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Mary Mosiman

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, May 16, 2016:
Accountant Mary Mosiman (b.1962) was appointed to this office in 2013 and won 57% in 2014.

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Tom Miller

Attorney General: Tom Miller (D)

Democratic nominee: Tom Miller
Republican nominee: ?

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, May 16, 2016:
Lawyer Tom Miller (b.1944) was first elected all the way back in 1978 and won 56% in 2014. He is currently the longest serving AG in the nation.

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Bill Northey

Secretary of Agriculture: Bill Northey (R)

Democratic nominee: ?
Republican nominee: Bill Northey

Rating, Jan 18, 2017:
TBD.

Status, Jan 18, 2017:
Agricultural economist Bill Northey (b.1959) was president of the National Corn Growers Association and active in several other agricultural jobs and offices before first winning election in 2006. He won 62% in 2014. Northey was thought of as a candidate for Governor in 2018, but has said he will defer to LG Reynolds, even going so far as saying he’s willing to serve as LG under her.

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State Senate: 50 (20D / 29R / 1I). Term: 4 years. Half elected in 2018/2020.
State House: 100 (41D / 59R). Term: 2 years. Elections in 2018.

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